Report reveals that women’s lives are being lost because of delays in diagnosing ovarian cancer

Posted By admin - 17th March 2020

Ovarian cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the ovary start to multiply, creating a tumour. If the cancer is not identified, there is a danger that it will spread to other parts of the body.

According to a report by Target Ovarian Cancer (the UK’s leading ovarian cancer charity), over 7000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer every year and 11 women die from the disease every day. Unlike cervical cancer, there is no effective screening tool for ovarian cancer.

If the disease is diagnosed early, a woman has a much better chance of survival. The report by Target Ovarian Cancer confirms that 93% of women survive for at least 5 years when they are diagnosed at the earliest stage of the disease. However, delays in diagnosis mean that 20% of women who are diagnosed are too ill to receive any treatment by the time they are finally diagnosed.

March 2020 is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month and therefore we want to raise awareness of the disease and its symptoms. The Target Ovarian Cancer report states that women do not always recognise the potential seriousness of their symptoms and that GPs need to be trained to recognise the symptoms so that women can be referred as quickly as possible.

The report states that there are 4 key symptoms of ovarian cancer:

  • Persistent abdominal bloating.
  • Feeling full quickly and / or loss of appetite.
  • Needing to wee more than normal or more urgently.
  • Pelvic or abdominal pain.

If you have concerns about any symptoms that you have been suffering, you can contact Target Ovarian Cancer or your GP, for advice.

Moosa Duke Solicitors are a leading, specialist Clinical Negligence law firm who regularly act on behalf of Claimants in cases concerning delays in diagnosis of cancer. If you feel that you, or a loved one, may have received substandard care, please contact us on 0116 254 7456 for a free, no-obligation conversation.

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